By Celia Clarke

Part III in our series: The Past, Present, and Future of Warmblood breeding poses the same fundamental questions to renowned experts representing a diverse range of interests and knowledge within the sport horse industry. Questions that are uppermost in many peoples’ minds, especially given the unprecedented challenges the world is facing in 2020 with the Covid-19 crisis.

At this current moment in time, while some countries are gradually able to ease their lock-downs, others are confronting new breakouts in the pandemic, especially in the southern half of the United States, and the economic fall-out of the past months will have a far-reaching and perhaps unpredictable impact. Earlier this year, some countries were already facing their own uncertainties with the oil-industry crisis, then being confronted with the coronavirus hot on its heels. However, the sport horse breeding industry has faced challenges in the past, and its players have certainly weathered more than their fair share of global storms. So, what does the future hold for the sport horse breeding industry over the next, five, 10, 15 years...? This article endeavours to provide thought-provoking and meaningful responses head on! (Our respondents answers appear in alphabetical order, and are colour coded for ease of recognition. Where initials do not appear, it indicates that a respondent declined to answer a particular question for reasons of knowledge or expertise.)

 

Dr. EVA MARIA BROOMER is a director of British Breeding, overseeing the equine programmes formerly run by the British Equestrian Federation, including a national foal and young horse evaluation series for sport horses and ponies. She also provides PR and consultancy services to the Anglo European Studbook (AES) and other clients in the breeding industry. Of German nationality, Eva was educated at Oxford University and earned her PhD from the University of Manchester. She currently holds a research Fellowship at Cardiff University and an Honorary Research Fellow position at John Rylands Research Institute in Manchester. EMB 

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